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Branching Arts presents:

A Journey Across Britain

A living example of indigenous life on the land




You could say we live in troubled times, where we are constantly reminded of what is not good about humanity and the way we treat our earth, how the systems that we use for governance and community are outmoded and bordering on slavery. We are often at a loss to offer up any alternative, mostly as any suggested scheme has a foot in the old mode of control and monetary dominance.

Here I am suggesting something else. A living example of native life. A beacon of holistic living on a very public scale.

I shall attempt here to put forward a picture of what is meant, for people to understand clearly what is being suggested, so that they might take part in further conversation and perhaps be involved in the enactment.

 

Allow me to tell you the story.

 

We travel on foot. It is the most enduring, unquestionable, healthy and complete form of travel. We take horses and carts and a couple of steam wagons to carry equipment and shelters. There are perhaps forty people, from many skills and talents, travellers, musicians, writers, chefs, practical folk etc all with a simple love of land and nature.

Along with us we take a cart that is a publishing outlet, with ability to publish pamphlets, record and release music, films, articles, and any other releases we use to publicize the nature and detail of our endeavour.

We also take a travelling apothecary, herbal medicine and other, for healing along the way, and a school, for children who come with us.

There would be a cart or a bus for mothers and tiny ones to travel comfortably.

Every one would have a tent :

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Big enough for a small family to sleep in comfortably. Also some smaller for those without families.

(I should say at this stage that we have the designs and capabilities to make all of the structures detailed here.)

Food is communal, big pots of soup or stew while on the road, and more involved meals when stationary.

We travel very slowly from place to place. Every week setting up our larger structures on a village green, country estate, common land or city park, for a showcase of indigenous life on the land.

We’ll be playing with all sorts of interesting things, looking at solutions to life’s problems from a land based native perspective. Issues from governance, to fresh water, land care, community, arts, power generation, travel, farming, money and many more, we’ll be asking for engagement, both from the public for discussion of ideas, and from the grassroots community, helping us to live what we find.

The structure for these talks and showcase, is in the form of a village. At the centre is a feast hall, for core discussions, decisions, community gathering and feasting.

Surrounding this are other structures for shows and talks. There might be a show on farming (having discussed the topic previously), a talk on roads, and a showcase of a new economic system. Each new change is implemented into daily life, and documented for dissemination to the wider community.

Amidst all of this is a healthy amount of high quality entertainment, craft, cookery, land care, dance and education.

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When the show is over, after maybe three to five days, we pack up and get back on the road.

For overwintering, we spend the time on one piece of land for a few months, putting on concerts and feasts, and consolidating the publishing.

Once we’ve set out, the show must carry on, in disciplined fashion, until the end.

 

That is part of the story.

 

We haven’t mentioned the many extra things. The children’s feasts, the tree planting, the community outreach, the home hub, the scouting for land, showers and loos, inviting of dignitaries, the vegetable delivery, the bbc interviews, albums of land songs, books, the instrument of dance, the church, our daily routine. There is a great deal to explore and talk about.

What is the best way to move forward?

At present we are beginning to build the structures. We’re starting with a dome. But it is slow. Without funding and without people’s help, things can only move at a snail’s pace.

What we are looking for are people who believe in the story, and can give some of their time to making it happen.

Ideally we would be having weekly discussions, and meeting up to build the structures and carts, talking to those that could get involved, working out how to do things.

It could happen very quickly, given the people and funding.

Please send this story to people you know who may be interested. It must be said that not everyone can come along, but anyone can help out.

Thank you for listening, please be in contact :

studio@branchingarts.com

07836 631763

www.branchingarts.com

www.awalkaroundbritain.com